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 1. New plastic that could be fully recycled created by Berkeley Lab

 
The scientists have created a next-generation plastic that can be fully recycled into new materials of any colour, shape, or form, without loss of performance or quality.
A team of researchers at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has designed a recyclable plastic that, like a Lego playset, can be disassembled into its constituent parts at the molecular level.
According to Peter Christensen, a postdoctoral researcher at Berkeley Lab, most plastics were never made to be recycled. 
But he said, they have discovered a new way to assemble plastics that takes recycling into consideration from a molecular perspective.
All plastics, from water bottles to automobile parts, are made up of large molecules called polymers, which are composed of repeating units of shorter carbon-containing compounds called monomers.
According to the researchers, the problem with many plastics is that the chemicals added to make them useful, such as fillers that make a plastic tough, or plasticisers that make a plastic flexible are tightly bound to the monomers and stay in the plastic even after it is been processed at a recycling plant.
According to the journal Nature Chemistry, unlike conventional plastics, the monomers of PDK plastic could be recovered and freed from any compounded additives simply by dunking the material in a highly acidic solution.
The acid helps to break the bonds between the monomers and separate them from the chemical additives that give plastic its look and feel.
After testing various formulations, the researchers demonstrated that not only does acid break down PDK polymers into monomers, but the process also allows the monomers to be separated from entwined additives.
 
2. LED lighting can damage eye`s retina
 
France government-run health watchdog has said, the blue light in LED lighting can damage the eye`s retina and disturb natural sleep rhythms. 
The French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety has said, new findings confirm earlier concerns that exposure to an intense and powerful LED light is photo-toxic and can lead to irreversible loss of retinal cells and diminished sharpness of vision. 
The agency recommended in a report that the maximum limit for acute exposure be revised, even if such levels are rarely met in the home or work environments.
The report distinguished between acute exposure of high-intensity LED light, and chronic exposure to lower intensity sources.
Long-lasting, energy efficient and inexpensive, light-emitting diode (LED) technology has gobbled up half of the general lighting market in a decade and will top 60 per cent by the end of next year, according to industry projections.
LED uses only a fifth of the electricity needed for an incandescent bulb of comparable brightness. 
 
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